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Clips Archive | Newsroom | News Releases | On the Record | For Journalists | Internal Clip Books internal access

Press Clips summarizes selected recent news coverage of our staff and activities. See the Press Clips Archive for earlier clips.

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 Top Stories from the Past Two Weeks as of September 19, 2006

Fake volcanoes could combat global warming
Cosmos (Sydney, Australia) (September 19, 2006)   By Erica Harrison
Creating fake volcanic eruptions could help combat global warming, according to a new U.S. study. This can significantly offset future warming and provide additional time to reduce dependence on fossil fuels,” said Tom Wigley of the National Centre for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, author of the study. . . . If found to be environmentally and technologically viable, such injections could provide a "grace period" of up to 20 years before major cutbacks in greenhouse gas emissions would be required, according to Wigley. . . . "Geoengineering could provide additional time to address the economic and technological challenges faced by a mitigation-only approach," said Wigley. He noted, however, that it's not a panacea.

Are humans causing stronger hurricanes?
Earth & Sky Radio Series (September 18, 2006) DMA: 0   
. . . Tom Wigley: ... the changes cannot be caused by natural fluctuations, which just leaves human factors as the dominant cause. JB: That's Tom Wigley, a climate scientist and study co-author. He said those "human factors" include more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, from burning fossil fuels. Tom Wigley: The real question is what's going to happen in the future ... I'll just give you a central estimate. If the warming has been 0.7 of a degree Celsius over the last 100 years, the warming for the next hundred years is probably going to be about four times that much. So that should give people cause for concern about climate change in general and what we can do to slow down the rate of warming.

Research balloons drop in on storms - A U.S.-French project gathers data about tropical weather from places hurricane hunters can't go.
Orlando (Florida) Sentinel (September 17, 2006) circ. 391,100   By Maya Bell
. . . A team of U.S. and French researchers wants to know why only a handful or two of the dozens of easterly waves, elongated patches of relatively low pressure that roll off west Africa, become tropical storms or hurricanes every year. The answer could depend on hard-to-come-by data that, for now, only high-flying balloons drifting on light easterly winds in the subfreezing temperatures of the stratosphere can capture. "It's a data set you cannot collect any other way," said Dave Parsons, a scientist with [t]he National Center for Atmospheric Research and the U.S. coordinator for the joint French-American balloon project. . . . "They float at a speed close to the movement of the easterly waves, so we can stay above those waves and monitor them from their earliest stages," Parsons said.

Getting Warmer? Don't Blame It on the Sun, Experts Say - A study of 1,000 years of variations in solar activity finds little or no effect on climate change.
Los Angeles Times (September 16, 2006) circ. 851,832
Contra Costa Times (Walnut Creek, California) (September 16, 2006) circ. 185,036
The Day (New London, Connecticut) (September 16, 2006) circ. 39,472
  By Robert Lee Hotz
Seeking another cause of global warming, some climate experts long suspected that the sun itself could be at fault. Changes in the sun's luminosity might be more to blame for the world's rising temperatures than industrial greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane, they speculated. Not so, scientists reported Wednesday in the journal Nature. By evaluating patterns of solar activity during the past thousand years, a team of experts concluded that variations in the sun's energy output played little or no role in global warming. . . . "The influence of the sun is utterly negligible," said Tom Wigley, a climate expert at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. "Compared with the human influence on climate, it is a very minor effect."

High-flown scheme to fend off warming - Boulder scientist refloats far-out idea to reflect sunlight back into space
Rocky Mountain News (September 15, 2006) circ. 527,726   By Jim Erickson
Using high-flying jets to spray a sun-reflecting mist into the upper atmosphere could halt global warming when combined with drastic worldwide cutbacks in greenhouse gas emissions, a Boulder scientist has concluded. But the techno-fix could be very costly and is fraught with uncertainty, admits Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. According to Wigley, a fleet of jets pumping sulfur high in the atmosphere could mimic the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo, which blasted 10 million tons of sulfur into the stratosphere and cooled the Earth's surface by nearly 1 degree Fahrenheit for about a year. . . . "Until recently, when we realized that the consequences of climate change were rather more severe than we had anticipated, these radical ideas had been dismissed - and probably rightly so," said Wigley, author of a paper on the sulfur-pumping idea that appears in today's edition of the journal Science. "But now it's come to the point where I think we have to consider these things seriously," he said.

Turning back the planetary thermostat
Seattle Post-Intelligencer (September 15, 2006) circ. 699,000   By Lisa Stiffler
. . . Tom Wigley, an atmospheric scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., has crunched the numbers for the idea of sprinkling the atmosphere with sulfur particles via airplanes or balloons. His research was published yesterday in the online version of the journal Science. "It could buy us some time ... and we need time," Wigley told the Denver Post's Katy Human in a story that ran today. . . . He's drawing comparisons for the idea to the cooling effect created by eruptions of volcanic ash. Wigley suggests that the sulfur equivalent of about half a Mount Pinatubo eruption each year would do the trick.

Experts warming to climate tinkering - As some scientists warn that the planet is already heating up faster than predicted, all sorts of ideas are on the table.
Denver Post (September 15, 2006) circ. 275,292   By Katy Human
The idea of tinkering with Earth's climate - once the domain of wing nuts and science-fiction writers - is getting a serious look by researchers. Faced with global warming, scientists are rethinking ideas such as sprinkling reflective dust in the atmosphere to cool the planet. "It could buy us some time ... and we need time," said Tom Wigley, an atmospheric scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder. Wigley's analysis of spraying sulfur particles into the atmosphere using airplanes or balloons appears in the journal Science today. . . . "I don't advocate directly that we should do this," Wigley said. "Rather, I'm saying this is a serious problem and we should think about all the options." . . . Such a project, even if it cost billions of dollars, would be a tiny fraction the cost of protecting cities from rising seas, fighting wildfires and coping with droughts, Wigley said.

KTLA Morning News First Edition
KTLA-TV CH 5 (WB) Los Angeles (September 15, 2006) DMA: 2
05:00 AM - 06:00 AM
  
00:35:28 TZ; El Nino: El Nino conditions are starting to form in the Pacific again, and some believe that global warming is to blame. V; Footage of people on a beach. V; Footage of a rally. I; Jason Robinson, Environment CA, talks about global warming. V; Footage of a CalNational sign. V; Footage of traffic. GR; Global warming in CA, courtesy of Environment CA. I; Candace Desbaillets, Environment CA, talks about the global warming issue. V; Footage of flooding. Researchers at the National Center for Atmospheric Research believe that El Nino conditions and global warming are connected. V; Footage of an Environment CA sign. Chris Wolfe reporting. 00:37:38

Scientists say volcano gas could offset global warming for 20 years
Irish Independent (Dublin, Ireland) (September 15, 2006) circ. 266,075   By Lewis Smith
. . . By spraying the same amount of sulphate particles, or aerosols, ejected by large volcanic eruptions, average temperatures around the world could be stabilised for two decades. . . . "If found to be environmentally and technologically viable, such injections could provide a 'grace period' of up to 20 years before major cutbacks in greenhouse gas emissions would be required," said Tom Wigley, of the US National Centre for Atmospheric Research. Professor Wigley said that a "relatively modest geo-engineering investment" could reduce the immediate economic and technological burden of mitigating the effects of greenhouse gas emissions.

Will a Layer of Silt in the Sky Save the Earth?
National Public Radio's Talk of the Nation (September 14, 2006) DMA: 0   By David Kestenbaum
[Tom Wigley] says he has a way to "Save the Earth from Global Warming" -- for a while, at least. The idea is to do what volcanoes do: inject material into the stratosphere. That would create a thin haze and reflect some sunlight. The general notion has been around for decades. But the paper proposes using it not as a permanent fix, but to buy time until greenhouse gases emissions can be brought under control. The proposal appears in the journal Science this week.

Scientists: Arctic sea ice tells of warming - Wintertime declines seen as strong sign of climate change
Rocky Mountain News (September 14, 2006) circ. 527,726   By Jim Erickson
Recent sharp declines in the extent of wintertime Arctic sea ice provide strong new evidence that global warming is already at work there, shrinking the habitat available to polar bears and potentially threatening rich fisheries, scientists reported Wednesday. . . . The cap shrinks each summer to roughly the size of the 48 contiguous U.S. states, then grows each winter. . . . But in the winter of 2004-2005 and again last winter, the cap's maximum size dipped 6 percent below the long-term average each winter. . . . Boulder climate modeler Gerald Meehl cautioned that more data are needed before scientists can conclude a long-term wintertime trend has been observed in Arctic sea ice. "It's hard to extract a trend from two years of data," said Meehl, who was not involved in the study. "But I think what we're seeing in a decrease of winter sea ice is consistent with what the models have been projecting and also consistent with the general features of a warming planet," said Meehl, who works at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Puffed-up planet puzzles astronomers
New Scientist (September 14, 2006) circ. 147,278   By Hazel Muir
An amazingly swollen planet has been spotted circling a star in the constellation Lacerta. It is the second of its kind, which makes astronomers suspect these inexplicably puffed-up worlds are actually common. . . . “Whatever the process that makes planets like this, it is not particularly rare,” comments Tim Brown, an extrasolar planet expert at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, US. “But I don't think anybody understands why HD 209458b or HAT-P-1 are so big.” . . . Brown concludes that HAT-P-1 will give astronomers plenty to chew on. “The result is a fascinating and difficult challenge to theorists, who need to explain how planets like these can form, and also to observers, whose job it is to quash such theories when they are clever but wrong,” he says.

Study acquits sun of climate change, blames humans
CNN.com (September 15, 2006)
ABCNew.com (Australia) (September 15, 2006)
Herald Sun (Southbank, Australia) (September 14, 2006) circ. 544,000
Zee News (Mumbal Maharashtra, India) (September 15, 2006)
Daily Telegraph (Surry Hills, Australia) (September 14, 2006) circ. 397,045
plus Courier-Mail (Bowen Hills, Australia), Yahoo!News.com (Australia and Asia), MSNBC.com
  By Alister Doyle (Reuters)
The sun's energy output has barely varied over the past 1,000 years, raising chances that global warming has human rather than celestial causes, a study showed on Wednesday. Researchers from Germany, Switzerland and the United States found that the sun's brightness varied by only 0.07 percent over 11-year sunspot cycles, far too little to account for the rise in temperatures since the Industrial Revolution. "Our results imply that over the past century climate change due to human influences must far outweigh the effects of changes in the sun's brightness," said Tom Wigley of the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research.

A new approach to global warming
Rocky Mountain News (September 14, 2006) circ. 527,726   
A two-pronged approach to stabilizing global warming, with cuts in greenhouse gas emissions combined with the release of heat-reflecting particles into the atmosphere, could prove more effective than either approach used separately, a Boulder climate researcher says. Injecting sulfate particles into the upper atmosphere could help buy time until the nations of the world can signficantly cut emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases, said Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Imitating volcano could slow global warming: computer model
CBCNews.com (Ontario, Canada) (September 14, 2006)   
. . . The idea of releasing large amount of sulphate particles into the atmosphere to block a portion of the sun's rays has been around since the 1970s. . . . NCAR's Tom Wigley ran several scenarios in the computer model. One simulated cutting carbon emissions immediately and lowering them by 50 per cent in the next 50 years. Another allowed for increasing emissions until the 2030s before the cutbacks begin. In those cases, Wigley found that simulating volcanic-scale sulphate emissions every year, every two years or every four years can keep global temperatures about constant, even with increasing carbon emissions, for the next 40 to 50 years. . . . The study is a purely theoretical work and doesn't explore the technical, political or environmental feasibility of intentionally altering the Earth's climate, a theoretical field called geoengineering.

Can pollutant stave off warming crisis? - Climate expert suggests adding sulfur dioxide to create shade
TVNZ.com (Auckland, New Zealand) (September 15, 2006)
MSNBC.com (September 14, 2006)
Reuters (September 14, 2006)
  By Deborah Zabarenko (Reuters)
To stall global warming for 20 years, one climate scientist has proposed lobbing sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, which would work in concert with cuts in greenhouse gas emissions. The sulfur dioxide, a pollutant on Earth, would form sulfate aerosol particles to shade the planet, much as the ash clouds from a major volcanic eruption do, said Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Wigley used computer models to determine that injecting sulfate particles at intervals from one to four years would have about the same cooling power as the 1991 eruption on Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines. . . . “I’m not suggesting we don’t reduce our dependence on fossil fuels for energy,” Wigley said in a telephone interview. ”I think that that’s the only long-term solution to the problem of global warming, we definitely have to do that. But ... can we make it economically and technologically easier by doing something that’s also technology, which may be cost-effective?” . . . “We’ve got to consider it very seriously because otherwise we might be in for much worse things just due to emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases,” he said.

No Sunshine for Global Warming Skeptics
Scientific American (September 13, 2006) circ. 589,232   By J.R. Minkel
Known variations in the sun's total energy output cannot explain recent global warming, say researchers who have reviewed the existing evidence. The judgment, which appears in the September 14 Nature, casts doubt on the claims of some global warming skeptics who have argued that long-term changes in solar output, or luminosity, might be driving the current climate pattern. . . . "The question is, were there times in the past when it was equally warm, and the answer is no," says Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He and three colleagues compared the average of a number of temperature reconstructions based on tree rings, ice cores and other data with models of Northern Hemisphere temperature that include different levels of solar variation, from little to a speculatively high amount. In all cases, "what you get out looks very much like the observations" from real samples, he says. "The warming [of the past 100 years] is greater than any in the last 1,000 years." The consistency meshes with solar physicists' latest understanding of how the sun works, the group notes.

Rebeca Chapa: Activists pressuring local governments to go green
San Antonio (Texas) Express-News (September 13, 2006) circ. 270,067   
. . . While politically positive, the recent discovery of vast oil reserves beneath the Gulf of Mexico will, if exploited fully, only prolong our oil consumption. A study released this week by the National Academy of Sciences asserts that human activity has a significant impact on climate change, which feeds the growing power of hurricanes in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. "The work that we've done kind of closes the loop here," Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo. and a co-author of the paper said in news accounts. . . . Global warming has its share of skeptics, and some are loath to believe human activity has either led to it or can stanch it. Sinkin said that's backward thinking. "People who once considered the world flat tried to eliminate the people who believed the world was round," he said. "Believing there is no global warming today, given the tremendous opinion of most scientists, is going back to a flat world concept."

Don't Blame the Sun
Science (September 13, 2006) circ. 129,590   By Dan Whipple
. . . A paper in tomorrow's issue of Nature concludes that changes in the sun's brightness over the past 100 years have been too small to significantly impact Earth's climate. . . . Although solar brightness has increased over the past 400 years, the team concludes that the amount is too small to explain the 20th century warming. . . . Asked whether total solar irradiance can be discounted as a driver of the current warming, climatologist Thomas Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, one of the paper's authors, says simply, "Yes." After a pregnant pause, he adds, "I'm very categorical about that final answer. I feel very confident about that." Still, Wigley says other solar processes, such as cosmic rays or ultraviolet radiation, could still have an affect on Earth's climate. The current study did not examine these phenomena.

Free Flow: After jets, cars: Success isn't enough for Mulally
International Herald Tribune (Neuilly Cedex, France) (September 13, 2006) circ. 242,182   By Don Phillips
Alan Mulally had it made. At age 61, the outgoing executive vice president of Boeing could have rested on his reputation as the man who saved the giant aircraft maker and returned the company to its top spot as the worldwide go-to company for airplanes. . . . One of Mulally's most interesting achievements at Boeing was the invention of a new aircraft maneuver that likely has saved thousands of lives over the years. With the [National] Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, United Airlines and others, a way was created to recognize and avoid a violent downdraft called a microburst. "We were killing people every year," Mulally said during an interview. He said he went to Washington many times in an effort - finally successful - to persuade the authorities to require training in the maneuver. Of all the many things he has done in aviation, these leaps forward in safety bring the broadest smile and the longest and most enthusiastic conversations.

Stronger Storms Blamed on Humans
Washington Post (September 12, 2006) circ. 724,242   
. . . A series of studies have shown an increase in the power of hurricanes in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, a strengthening that storm experts say is tied to rising sea-surface temperatures. . . . "The important conclusion is that the observed [sea-surface temperature] increases in these hurricane breeding grounds cannot be explained by natural processes alone," said Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., a co-author of the paper. "The best explanation for these changes has to include a large human influence." The research team, led by Benjamin Santer of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., studied the relationship of climate and hurricanes using 22 climate models at 15 institutions around the world.

Human activities increase ocean temperatures, breed hurricanes: Study
People's Daily (Beijing, China) (September 12, 2006) circ. 3,000,000
Xinhua News Agency (September 12, 2006)
  By Zhu Jin (Xinhua News Agency)
A study conducted by atmospheric scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, and other institutions has shown that the rising sea surface temperatures of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans over the last century is linked to human activities. The study, based on 22 different computer models of the climate system, was published on-line in the Sept. 11 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Hurricanes are complex phenomena that are influenced by a variety of physical factors, such as sea surface temperatures, wind shear, water vapor and atmospheric stability, according to the study. . . . "It is important to note that we expect global temperatures and sea surface temperatures to increase even more rapidly over the next century," said Tom Wigley, a co-author of the study. . . .

Study: Earth and Space Weather Connected
MSNBC.com (September 12, 2006)
Yahoo!News.com (September 12, 2006)
LiveScience.com (September 12, 2006)
  By Ker Than
Space weather in the upper reaches of the atmosphere is affected by weather conditions down here on Earth, a new study suggests. . . . The finding, detailed in the Aug. 11 issue of Geophysical Research Letters, is surprising because scientists didn't think the ionosphere and the troposphere--the lower part of the atmosphere where terrestrial weather happens--affected one another. . . . Using Global Scale Wave Model, a computer simulation developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the researchers confirmed that the areas above the tropical rainforests produce tides of air in the atmosphere. These tides indirectly affect the plasma bands by modifying a layer of the atmosphere that helps shape them.

Increasing ocean temperatures fuelling more powerful hurricanes, say scientists
The Guardian (Manchester, U.K.) (September 12, 2006) circ. 378,703   By Ian Sample
. . . The scientists, led by Ben Santer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, used 22 climate models to investigate the possible causes of a rise in sea surface temperatures of up to 0.67C in the Atlantic and Pacific tropics from 1906 to 2005. Each computer model was run several times to work out how much sea surface temperatures would have warmed with and without rising levels of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. . . . Tom Wigley, another scientist on the study, at the National Centre for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, added: "The best explanation for these increases has to include a large human influence. We expect global temperatures and sea surface temperatures to increase more rapidly over the next century."

Climate models: Humans fueling hurricanes - Tests show strong correlation between warming ocean, rising emissions
MSNBC.com (September 12, 2006)
Yahoo!News.com (September 12, 2006)
CBSNews.com (September 11, 2006)
  (MSNBC staff and news service reports)
. . . Tom Wigley, a co-author and a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., said the study “closes the loop” between climate change and powerful storms like Hurricane Katrina. The study follows research papers over the past year or so that have shown an increase in the power of hurricanes, but also skepticism from some experts who question the reliability of computer models. Wigley's team had the backing of several peers at a briefing for reporters Thursday ahead of the publication of the new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. . . . Asked at the briefing if they would recommend changes in public policy, Greg Holland of the National Center for Atmospheric Research said, “It is important to note that we’re not policymakers. Our role is to present the best possible conclusions from the available evidence.”

The gathering storms: How man is making the wind blow
The Independent (London) (September 12, 2006) circ. 261,043   By Michael McCarthy and Abigail Townsend
It's hard at first to get your head around the idea, indeed it seems outlandish: that by switching on the light, or stamping on the car accelerator, you're helping to pulverise a great city such as New Orleans. But that's the inescapable implication of a piece of research published yesterday by a group of the world's most distinguished climate scientists. Freak storms such as Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Big Easy a year ago, are not just freaks, they suggest. They are down to us. . . . "The important conclusion is that the observed SST increases in these hurricane breeding grounds cannot be explained by natural processes alone," said one of the scientists involved, Dr Tom Wigley, from the National Centre for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. "The best explanation for these changes has to include a large human influence." He added: "It is important to note we expect global temperatures and SSTs to increase even more rapidly in the next century.

Study says global warming is helping to spawn major hurricanes
South Florida Sun-Sentinel (September 12, 2006) circ. 257,000   By Ken Kaye
. . . A study released Monday asserts that human-made greenhouse gases are raising sea surface temperatures. Because of that, scientists say, the Atlantic is boiling up more major hurricanes, five of which have slammed Florida in the past two years. "We can never be 100 percent sure of anything when we look at climate studies, but in this case we are very confident in the results we've produced," said Tom Wigley, a senior scientist with National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., and one of two primary authors.

Report links global warming, storms
San Francisco Chronicle (September 12, 2006) circ. 398,246   By Keay Davidson
. . . Tom Wigley, one of the world's top climate modelers and a co-author of the paper, said in a teleconference last week that the scientists tried to figure out what caused the oceans to warm by running many different computer models based on possible single causes. Those causes ranged from human production of greenhouse gases to natural variations in solar intensity. Wigley said that when the researchers reviewed the results, they found that only one model was best able to explain changing ocean temperatures, and it pointed to greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The most infamous greenhouse gas is carbon dioxide, a product of human burning of fossil fuels in cars and factories. . . . Nineteen scientists from 10 institutions were involved in the Proceedings paper. In addition to Lawrence Livermore, other U.S. institutions included Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, NASA, UC Merced, Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla (San Diego County), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

New study ties global warming to stronger hurricanes
USA Today (September 12, 2006) circ. 2,272,815
Baltimore Sun (September 12, 2006) circ. 320,912
Orange County Register (Santa Ana, California) (September 12, 2006) circ. 303,418
Columbus Dispatch (September 12, 2006) circ. 251,045
Sydney (Australia) Morning Herald circ. 210,085
plus DiscoveryChannel.com, Royal Gazette (Hamilton, Bermuda), Insurance Journal (Montreal, Canada)
  By Randolph E. Schmid (Associated Press)
. . . A series of studies over the past year or so has shown an increase in the power of hurricanes in the Atlantic and Pacific, a strengthening that storm experts say is tied to rising ocean surface temperatures. . . . "The work that we've done kind of closes the loop here," said Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., a co-author of the paper. . . . While previous studies have looked at entire oceans, this work focused on the smaller areas of the Atlantic and Pacific where tropical storms form.

Hurricane-human link seen
Rocky Mountain News (September 12, 2006) circ. 527,726   By Jim Erickson
. . . Authors of the latest report, published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, say their work substantially strengthens the chain of evidence pointing to humans. "The work that we've done kind of closes the loop," said Tom Wigley, of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder. Three NCAR researchers and colleagues from eight other institutions looked at long-term changes in sea-surface temperatures, or SSTs. "The important conclusion is that the observed SST increases in these hurricane breeding grounds cannot be explained by natural processes alone," Wigley said. "The best explanation for these changes has to include a large human influence." . . . NCAR scientists and their colleagues . . . used 22 state-of-the-art computerized global climate models to determine what's causing the ocean warming. They looked at the output of more than 80 simulations using models developed at 15 research institutions around the world. The simulations allowed the researchers to examine the roles of various factors that affect climate, including variations in the sun's output, volcanic eruptions, changes in ozone levels and greenhouse gases.

Man-made factors fuel hurricanes, study finds
Boston Globe (September 12, 2006) circ. 397,288   By Beth Daley
. . . They were trying to answer two questions: Is there a natural cycle contributing to a rise in sea-surface temperatures? And to what degree are humans contributing to the ocean warming? No single model has been agreed upon to explain the complicated workings of the entire climate system; instead, scientists have devised 22 models, each using its own equations. Santer's team looked at all the outcomes to increase their confidence in the results. The group ran 80 simulations on superfast computers to see what ocean temperature changes would occur over hundreds of years under different scenarios, from volcano eruptions that can temporarily cool sea temperatures to solar events that can heat the seas. Then they compared the results with actual ocean temperatures. Overall, the group saw no clear natural reason or cycle in the North Atlantic and Pacific that could explain the warming of oceans over the past century. Instead, they concluded that human-caused climate change is the primary factor. ``The work that we've done closes the loop," that humans are warming the oceans, said Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, who is a co-author of the study. It's unclear what policy implications might come out of the study, although it will probably add to growing pressure from environmentalists and some legislators to pass laws limiting the release of carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas, from power plants.

Good Day New York Wake-Up
WNYW-TV CH 5 (FOX) (September 12, 2006) New York DMA: 0
05:30 AM - 06:00 AM
  
00:16:04 Weather news: A new study is making a link between stronger hurricanes and the human causes of global warming. V; Waves in ocean. A series of studies this year have shown an increase in the power of hurricanes, and storm experts tied that to rising sea surface temperatures. The new report adds another connection. Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research is one of the studies authors. He says natural processes alone cannot account for temperature increases in areas where hurricanes form. V; Downed trees. 00:16:30

Global warming is causing hurricane increase, scientists say - Report is strongest evidence yet
Palm Beach Post (September 12, 2006) circ. 168,216
Western Star (Lebanon, Ohio) (September 12, 2006) circ. 16,300
Atlanta (Georgia) Journal-Constitution (September 11, 2006) circ. 365,011
  By Mike Toner
. . . The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provide the strongest evidence yet that man-made greenhouse gases are playing a major role in the increase in both the number and intensity of hurricanes. "There is now substantial evidence that human-caused changes in greenhouse gases are the main driver of sea surface temperature in hurricane forming regions of the Atlantic and the Pacific," says Thomas Wigley, senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. So-called greenhouse gases — primarily carbon dioxide and methane — are emitted by factories, power plants, automobiles, intensive agriculture and forest burning. Levels of such gases in the atmosphere have been increasing since the dawn of the industrial revolution. . . . "This study kind of closes the loop," says Wigley. "Sea surface temperature increases in these hurricane breeding grounds cannot be explained by natural processes alone. The best explanation for these changes has to include a large human influence."

Warmer oceans produce stronger hurricanes
United Press International (September 12, 2006)   (United Press International)
A study by 19 U.S. and European scientists finds greenhouse gases, not natural cycles, are causing warmer oceans that produce more powerful hurricanes. "Clearly, this is a result of the increasing concentrations of greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere," study co-author Tom Wigley, a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., told ABC News. "The work that we've done kind of closes the loop here."

Humans get blame for more powerful hurricanes
Philadelphia Inquirer (September 12, 2006) circ. 350,457
San Jose Mercury News (September 11, 2006) circ. 274,382
McClatchy Newspapers (September 11, 2006)
  By Robert S. Boyd (McClatchy Newspapers)
Humans are largely to blame for the recent trend toward more powerful hurricanes, a group of 19 American and European scientists declared Monday. In a paper appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists claim to have established a solid chain linking human burning of fossil fuels, global warming, higher ocean temperatures, and the intensity and duration of recent hurricanes such as Katrina and Wilma. . . . Greg Holland, a meteorologist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., said, "We still don't understand a lot of the linkages, but the relationship is quite solid." Holland acknowledged that global warming isn't the sole cause of the escalation in extreme hurricanes. He estimated that natural variability may account for up to 30 percent of the changes in the storms' power but that the other 70 percent is "due to climate change." . . . Thomas Wigley, a climate expert at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, predicted that ocean temperatures and hurricane violence will continue to increase. "The changes we expect over the next 100 years are far greater than over the past 100 years," said Wigley, a co-author of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences paper. "Sea surface temperatures in the past are small beans compared to what we're going to see in the future."

Humans blamed for powerful hurricanes
Seattle Post-Intelligencer (September 12, 2006) circ. 699,000   By Lee Bowman (Scripps Howard News Service)
Rising ocean temperatures in key hurricane nurseries are due primarily to increased greenhouse-gas concentrations from human activity, scientists report in a new study. . . . "The important conclusion is that the observed SST increases in these hurricane breeding grounds cannot be explained by natural processes alone," said Tom Wigley, a researcher at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., one of the study's co-authors. "The best explanation for these changes has to include a large human influence."

Boulder scientists connect humans, hurricanes
Rocky Mountain News (September 11, 2006) circ. 527,726   By Jim Erickson
. . . Using 22 different computer models of the climate system, scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder and nine other institutions report that the warming of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans over the last century is linked to human activities.

Storm Warnings: Trying to Understand the Causes of Hurricanes
Voice of America (Radio) (September 11, 2006) DMA: 8   
. . . A new study has just been published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, in the United States. Scientists examined rising ocean temperatures in areas of the Atlantic and Pacific where hurricanes form. They found an eighty-four percent chance that humans have caused most of the observed rise over the last one hundred years. They say warming sea surface temperatures are mainly the result of an increase in greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. Earlier research examined temperature changes over very large ocean areas, such as all of the Atlantic or Pacific. The new study involved much smaller hurricane formation areas. The researchers say they used most of the world's computer climate models to study the causes of the temperature changes. The study involved scientists from ten research centers. These included Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California and the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado. Tom Wigley from the Colorado team says: "The best explanation for these changes has to include a large human influence."

Humans 'causing stronger storms'
BBCNews.com (London) (September 11, 2006)   By Richard Black
. . . Scientists calculate that two-thirds of the recent rise in sea temperatures, thought to fuel hurricanes, is down to anthropogenic emissions. . . . Sea surface temperature and hurricane strength vary naturally, and deciphering a clear impact of human greenhouse gas emissions has been difficult. . . . [I]n June this year, Kevin Trenberth of the US National Center for Atmospheric Research, analysed the exceptionally active 2005 North Atlantic hurricane season. . . . . Benjamin Santer, Tom Wigley and colleagues conclude: "There is an 84% chance that external forcing [human activities] explain at least 67% of the observed SST increases" in the Pacific and Atlantic zones where hurricanes form. "The important conclusion is that the observed SST increases in these hurricane breeding grounds cannot be explained by natural processes alone," said Dr Wigley. "The best explanation for these changes has to include a large human influence."

Rising Sea Surface Temperature Tied to Human Action, Study Says
Bloomberg New's Bloomberg.com (September 11, 2006) circ. 300,000   By Samantha Zee
. . . The research raised concerns about the causes of the rising temperatures, particularly in parts of the Atlantic and Pacific where hurricanes and other tropical cyclones form, [Benjamin Santer] said. . . . Previous efforts to understand the causes of changes in sea surface temperatures focused on temperature changes averaged over very large ocean areas, such as the entire Atlantic or Pacific basins. The latest study focuses on the temperature changes in much smaller hurricane formation regions. Santer, working with a team of atmospheric scientists that included Tom Wigley, senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, examined data from 22 computer models of the climate system taken from about 15 research centers around the world. . . . ``The important conclusion is that the observed sea surface temperature increases in these hurricane breeding grounds can't be explained by natural processes alone,'' Wigley said in a statement. ``The best explanation for these changes has to include a large human influence.''

New Data Erases Doubt on Storms and Warming
Inter Press Service (Rome, Italy) (September 11, 2006)   By Stephen Leahy
. . . Sea surface temperatures are rising due to global warming and more than a dozen studies since Hurricane Katrina hit the United States last August show this has resulted in the dramatic increase in the strength of hurricanes in recent years. . . . Those SST increases have affected large parts of the Atlantic Ocean, so that the number of hurricanes have increased as well as their intensity, says Greg Holland, a climatologist and divisional director of the National Centre for Atmospheric Research. Although natural variability plays a part in the increase in numbers and intensity, the impact of climate change is the predominant factor, said Holland. "The changes we're seeing in the North Atlantic are 70 percent due to climate change effects," he said. . . . Although the computer models were created by various climate research centres around the world, there was "exceptional correlation that human-induced climate change was the only way to get those SST results", said Tom Wigley a climate scientist at the National Centre for Atmospheric Research and a co-author of the PNAS paper. These are the latest computer models and researchers have a high level of confidence in their results, says Wigley. "There is less than a one percent chance that the changes in SST could be the result of non-human factors," he said.

Hurricane Warning - New Study Billed as Important Link Between Global Warming and Hurricanes
ABCNews.com (September 11, 2006)   By Clayton Sandell
. . . Previous studies had already suggested a connection between warming ocean temperatures and stronger hurricanes. This study provides a new and important link needed to show that global warming, not natural cycles, is responsible, according to the authors and other hurricane researchers. "Clearly, this is a result of the increasing concentrations of greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere," said co-author Tom Wigley, a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo. "The work that we've done kind of closes the loop here." The study used 22 sophisticated computer climate models to examine the tropical regions of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, where hurricanes, also called tropical cyclones, are born. In those areas, the temperatures have risen an average of between a half degree Fahrenheit and 1.2 degrees Fahrenheit, over the last century. . . . "If the models can simulate the observations, that tells us about the credibility and skill of the models, and that's important," Wigley said. He noted the models performed "exceptionally well," accurately predicting long-term climate trends, natural weather patterns, and even the effect of volcanic eruptions. Having established their confidence in the computer models, researchers then used them to examine what was making the oceans warmer in those hurricane-forming regions. . . . "Greenhouse gases really are the dominant cause of the forcing of the climate system by human influences," Wigley said. Hurricane scientist Greg Holland agreed, saying the results contradict the idea that natural cycles are responsible for stronger storms. "One cannot say that [increased hurricane activity] is due to natural variability. It's just simply impossible to say that," said Holland, who also works at the National Center for Atmospheric Research but was not a co-author. "The data show that there is an increasing trend, which is associated with human-induced climate change."

Turbulence theory gets a bit choppy
USA Today (September 10, 2006) circ. 2,272,815   By Dan Vergano
. . . No one really understands precisely how the flow of gas or liquids transitions from smooth flow to choppy turbulence. . . . This drives engineers nuts (I can attest to this as a former engineer) because turbulence disrupts and drags air, gas and liquids that flow in and on everything from pipelines to airplane wings to artificial heart valves — all the apparatus of an industrial society — in ways both costly and unpredictable. To take just one example, turbulence costs U.S. airlines an annual $100 million due to injuries and delays, according to the National Center for Atmospheric Research's estimates.

Should N.Y. step up global warming fight? No
New York Daily News (Albany) (September 10, 2006) circ. 708,477   By Patrick J. Michaels
. . . The California Global Warming Solutions Act is a watered-down version of the 1996 UN Kyoto Protocol, which mandates that most industrial nations reduce their emissions a tiny bit more by 2008-2012. California will fail at Kyoto-lite, and New York shouldn't follow in its footsteps. Why? Because the technology to reduce emissions simply isn't there or isn't politically acceptable. . . . Their law requires a 25% reduction in overall emissions while, thanks to all kinds of immigration, population growth rises rapidly. . . . But let's dream that California does lead the nation and even the world, and that every industrialized nation magically achieves a California-size reduction in emissions. According to scientists from the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research, the amount of warming these reductions would prevent by the year 2060 is 0.05 degrees Celsius.

Summer's running out like an unplugged fan... but not the news
Seattle Post-Intelligencer (September 6, 2006) circ. 699,000   By Robert McClure
. . . We've never been able to figure out whether this link between climate change and more intense hurricanes is real or not. But we haven't looked into it that carefully, either, since we're not particularly vulnerable to them here in the Pacific Northwest. Well, tomorrow the enviro PR firm Resource Media promises to deliver the goods, with a teleconference for reporters with four scientists including Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. If they come up with something you can link to, we'll do so here. (Leading climate-change skeptic Patrick Michaels recently hit on the hurricane theory as well as other climate matters in this recent piece called "Is the Sky Really Falling? A Review of Recent Global Warming Scare Stories." The title makes it sound like he's going after the news media, but if you get into it you'll see it's the same old thing, Michaels taking issue with what other virtually all the other scientists actively studying this topic are reporting.)


 Other Stories from the Past Two Weeks as of September 19, 2006
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Editorial: The rest of the story - Boulder's role vital to global-warming research
Daily Camera (Boulder) (September 18, 2006) circ. 33,000   
Over the past decade, Boulder has been a frequent target of nationwide media mockery, some valid, but much of it inflated and uninformed, because of scandals emanating from the University of Colorado and the investigation into the murder of JonBenet Ramsey. But 20 years from now, those stories will be mere footnotes, if that, in a world dealing with the impacts of global warming. . . . In Thursday's issue of the journal Nature, a study co-authored by In Thursday's issue of the journal Nature, a study co-authored by National Center for Atmospheric Research scientist Tom Wigley found that variations in the sun's brightness due to sunspots and other phenomena are too small to account for warming. On the brighter side (or is it dimmer?), a study in the journal Science by Wigley — busy man — found that atmospheric application of aerosols could slow the pace of warming and give humanity some breathing room when it comes to cutting back greenhouse-gas emissions. National Center for Atmospheric Research scientist Tom Wigley found that variations in the sun's brightness due to sunspots and other phenomena are too small to account for warming. On the brighter side (or is it dimmer?), a study in the journal Science by Wigley — busy man — found that atmospheric application of aerosols could slow the pace of warming and give humanity some breathing room when it comes to cutting back greenhouse-gas emissions.

Free DSCOVR! - A climate satellite is built and paid for. Nations offer to launch it for free. Scientists say it's an essential mission. So what's it doing in a box outside DC?
Seed (September 18, 2006) circ. 100,000   By Mitchell Anderson
. . . Could the decision to kill DSCOVR have anything to do with the politics of climate science? For years, Republicans have claimed the need for more data before acting to curb global warming. A letter President Bush wrote to four Republican senators in March 2001 (after DSCOVR's endorsement by a National Academy of Sciences review panel) referred to "the incomplete state of scientific knowledge of the causes of, and solutions to, global climate change." More recently, in a 2005 briefing, White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan asserted that "there is still a lot of uncertainty when it comes to the science of climate change." Dr. Kevin Trenberth, Head of the Climate Analysis Section at National Center for Atmospheric Research, said, "It is as if the administration prefers to continue to hide behind lack of definitive data as an excuse for lack of action and leadership."

Climate Change - Support Voiced For Geo-Engineering Research To Combat Global Warming
Chemical & Engineering News (September 18, 2006) circ. 136,267   By Ivan Amato
The call to at least consider audacious geo-engineering steps that would fill the stratosphere with globe-cooling aerosols to check global warming got louder last week. In Science, Tom M. L. Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in Boulder, Colo., writes that reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the long-term solution to global warming but that nearer term engineering of the atmosphere might provide "additional time to address the economic and technological challenges faced by a mitigation-only approach". . . . Wigley has quite visibly joined Crutzen in this view, this time running several aerosol-producing scenarios through a simple atmospheric model. Adding just 5 million metric tons of sulfur dioxide annually to the stratosphere to produce sunlight-reflecting clouds or a light-scattering haze "would have a significant influence," Wigley says.

Epidemic Influenza And Vitamin D
MedicalNewsToday.com (September 15, 2006)   By J. J. Cannell
. . . As I waited for the hospital to finish collecting data from all the patients taking vitamin D at the time of the outbreak - to see if it really reduced the incidence of influenza - I decided to research the literature thoroughly, finding all the clues in the world's medical literature that indicated if vitamin D played any role in preventing influenza or other viral respiratory infections. I worked on the paper for over a year, writing it with Professor Edward Giovannucci of Harvard, Professor Reinhold Vieth of the University of Toronto, Professor Michael Holick of Boston University, Professor Cedric Garland of U.C., San Diego, as well as Dr. John Umhau of the National Institute of Health, Sasha Madronich of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and Dr. Bill Grant at the Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center. After numerous revisions, we submitted our paper to the same widely respected journal where Dr. Hope-Simpson published most of his work several decades ago. Epidemiology and Infection, known as The Journal of Hygiene in Hope-Simpson's day, recently published our paper.

New research model shows El Nino's effect on drought - Riddle behind failure of monsoons may be solved
Daily Camera (Boulder) (September 15, 2006) circ. 33,000   By Boonsri Dickinson
Boulder researchers have shown that El Nino events evolving in the central Pacific doomed Indian monsoons to failure — and until now, predicting the droughts has been hit or miss. El Nino, an abnormal warming of surface ocean waters in the tropical Pacific, is not as mysterious as historical rainfall records might reveal. . . . "It takes into account not just that there is an El Nino but also the character of the El Nino," said Kevin Trenberth, head of the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, whose earlier work on El Nino indices serves as the basis for Rajagopalan’s model. "As all El Ninos differ, this means these differences can be factored into the effect on India and elsewhere," he said.

Aerosols could slow global warming - NCAR scientist says technique could buy time to cut greenhouse gases
Daily Camera (Boulder) (September 15, 2006) circ. 33,000   By Laura Snider
. . . Tom Wigley, a National Center for Atmospheric Research senior scientist, used a computer model to compare two possible scenarios for slowing climate warming: one relying exclusively on reducing greenhouse gases; and one that pairs emission reduction with injections of sulfates, or aerosols, into the stratosphere. What he found was that preventing the Earth from warming 2 degrees Celsius — the amount of warming often cited as the threshold for dangerous climate change — with emission reduction alone would be a colossal task. . . . "What I'm suggesting is not curing the problem solely with geoengineering, but using a little geoengineering to gain time to solve the problem of carbon dioxide more holistically," Wigley said.

WB2 News At Nine
KWGN-TV CH 2 (WB) Denver (September 14, 2006) DMA: 18
09:00 PM - 10:00 PM
  
00:32:55 Global Warming: Could aerosols be good for the environment? The National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder just put out a study suggesting just that. The study says injections of certain aerosols could help cool the earth, slowing global warming. It’s an affect similar to the one created by a volcano in 1991. V; Building in mountains. I; Tom Wigley: “The silver oxide that we would put into the stratosphere would then form very small droplets of sulfuric acid, and they would reflect back incoming solar radiation, and they would have a cooling effect.” The idea is to cool the earth by the time it would take to make drastic cuts in the use of fossil fuels. 00:33:33

Global warming not from sun
Daily Camera (Boulder) (September 14, 2006) circ. 33,000   
Changes in the sun's brightness over the past millennium have been too small to account for global warming, according to a new study that includes research from Boulder's National Center for Atmospheric Research. The study, titled "Variations in Solar Luminosity and Their Effect on the Earth's Climate," was published today in the journal Nature. NCAR scientist Tom Wigley was among its co-authors. . . . "Our results imply that, over the past century, climate change due to human influences must far outweigh the effects of changes in the sun's brightness," Wigley said in the release.

Debut: think Dolby, Dylan
Colorado Daily News (September 14, 2006) circ. 15,329   By Richard Valenty
. . . Yes, Thomas Dolby, best known for his 1983 synth-pop hit “She Blinded Me with Science,” will blind Boulder as the musical headliner for the Twenty Ninth opening party. But the opening will also showcase a series of new interactive scientific kiosks known as “The Wonder of Science at Twenty Ninth Street.” Teams from NOAA, NIST, the Space Science Institute, JILA and LASP from CU-Boulder, NCAR and NREL are preparing various kiosks designed in part to give guests a little insight into the world(s) of the local organizations.

Sun's Variations Have Little Affect on Global Warming
Yahoo!News.com (September 13, 2006)
LiveScience.com (September 13, 2006)
  By Sara Goudarzi
. . . During times of high activity, like in year 2000, the Sun shines about 0.07 percent brighter, researchers report in the September 14 issue of the journal Nature. . . . Although events such as sunspots have increased in the last 400 years, their effect only contributed a small amount to global warming, the results show. "Our results imply that, over the past century, climate change due to human influences must far outweigh the effects of changes in the Sun's brightness," said study co-author Tom Wigley of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Humans get blame for more powerful hurricanes - Researchers link rising ocean temperatures and global warming
Charlotte (North Carolina) Observer (September 12, 2006) circ. 226,082   By Bruce Henderson
. . . It's the latest in a yearlong string of studies linking storms and warming. Those studies don't dismiss theories that hurricane activity rises and falls in decades-long cycles, but they give those natural swings less importance. . . . Hurricanes form only over warm, humid ocean surfaces. As global sea-surface temperatures rose one-half to one degree since the 1970s, some studies show that extreme hurricanes have become more common. This week's research examined 22 climate models to tease out what makes sea temperatures change. . . . "The only thing left to explain this very large change is human increases in greenhouse gases," such as carbon dioxide from cars and power plants, said the study's co-author Tom Wigley, a scientist at the federally funded National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo. Eighteen other scientists from a number of other institutions participated. The study didn't attempt to predict future hurricane activity. But for rising sea-surface temperatures, Wigley said, "what we've seen in the past is small beans compared to what we expect in the future." Wigley's colleague Greg Holland estimated that about 70 percent of the increased storm activity is due to climate change. The rest, he said, is due to natural causes.

Y. professor has joined meteorology panel
Deseret (Utah) Morning News (September 12, 2006) circ. 63,505   
Andrew Gibbons, chairman of the Department of Instructional Psychology and Technology in the McKay School of Education at Brigham Young University, is a new member of the advisory panel for meteorology education. During the three-year appointment on the Cooperative Program for Operational Meteorology Education and Training (COMET), Gibbons will review the group's training and development plans for meteorology and atmospheric sciences. . . . "They (COMET) provide training for the news weather person, but that person just scratches the surface in training," Gibbons said. "They're training people involved in all areas of regional meteorology — analysts, forecasters, aviation people, transportation people — people most of us aren't aware of."

Local 8
KFMB-TV CH 8 (CBS) San Diego DMA: 26
09/12/06 05:30 AM - 06:00 AM
09/11/06 11:00 PM - 11:35 PM
  
00:12:55 A new study is raising fears that global warming could be fueling more powerful hurricanes. The study, co-authored by the National Center for Atmospheric Research, shows an increase in ocean temperature is creating more intense hurricanes. The study appears in the latest issue of “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.” 00:13:18

Warming intensifies hurricanes - New study links greenhouse gases to stronger storms
Daily Camera (Boulder) (September 12, 2006) circ. 33,000   By Laura Snider
Global warming has intensified hurricanes, according to a new study authored by 19 prominent climate researchers, including three scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder. The study — which publishes today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences — links human-produced greenhouse gases to a rise in sea-surface temperatures, which in turn generate stronger hurricanes. . . . Until today's study, the only piece of the puzzle still missing was a conclusion about whether the rise in sea-surface temperature is because of natural cycles or human-induced climate change. "The work we've done kind of closes the loop here," said co-author Tom Wigley, a senior scientist at NCAR.

Human Activities Found To Affect Ocean Temperatures In Hurricane Formation Regions
ScienceDaily.com (September 12, 2006)   Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
New research shows that rising sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in hurricane “breeding grounds” of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are unlikely to be purely natural in origin. These findings complement earlier work that uncovered compelling scientific evidence of a link between warming SSTs and increases in hurricane intensity. . . . Using 22 different computer models of the climate system, atmospheric scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and ten other research centers have shown that the warming of the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans over the last century is directly linked to human activities. . . . Santer, in conjunction with Livermore colleagues Peter Gleckler, Krishna AchutaRao, Jim Boyle, Mike Fiorino, Steve Klein and Karl Taylor, collaborated with researchers from the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the University of California, Merced, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the University of Hamburg in Germany, the Climatic Research Unit and Manchester University in the United Kingdom, the NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Climatic Data Center.

Precision Climate Modeling Forecast By ORNL Researchers
ScienceDaily.com (September 9, 2006)   Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Climate modeling of tomorrow will feature precision and scale only imagined just a few years ago, say researchers David Erickson and John Drake of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Computer Science and Mathematics Division. . . . "Before, we had to make compromises that ultimately limited the resolution and scope of our models and subsequent predictions," said Drake, who noted that climate modeling is an enormous multi-agency effort. . . . Drake, Erickson and other researchers from ORNL are working with colleagues at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, NASA, Duke University, Georgia Tech and national labs across the country to develop a climate end station. The primary objective of the station will be to upgrade and maintain the Community Climate Systems Model, which has already been used to generate almost 12,000 climate simulations. This information is aimed at helping scientists assess the risk of human-induced climate change.

Stormy solar weather ahead - Sunspot sighting, models suggest new solar cycle
Daily Camera (Boulder) (September 8, 2006) circ. 33,000   By Boonsri Dickinson
Sunspot 905 appeared last month as a white blotch where the magnetic instruments staring at the sun usually see black ones. It marked the start of a new solar cycle that could bring the worst space weather since 1958, Boulder scientists say. . . . Until now, no one could explain how such Earth-sized sunspots appeared. But researchers at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder say their model is the first to solve the two-centuries-old riddle of the erratic solar cycle. "This method is analogous to what a meteorologist does," said Mausumi Dikpati, a scientist at NCAR's High Altitude Observatory who leads the team that created the model. . . . Scientists believe they're seeing the beginning of a new cycle, which could trigger solar storms in 2012.

Brown Cloud Engulfs Colorado As Rampant Growth of Region Continues Unchecked
Telluride (Colorado) Watch (September 8, 2006) circ. 5,590   By Andrew Sawyer
. . . The sky directly overhead is that deep blue that has always graced this high-altitude landscape and playground known as Colorado, but as I lower my gaze to the horizon – an even more thick and dense layer of haze – dust and smog blurs and muddies the sky obscuring the view of what was once pristine. Unfortunately the scene I’ve just described is hardly unusual. It is oftentimes depressing these days to be a mountaineer, frequenting fragile environs where the impacts of human activity are most apparent, knowing that it wasn’t always like this. You don’t need to be an expert to know that Earth’s environment is changing rapidly. Some days are worse than others. . . . If only we as individuals could learn to care and respect our planet, we might become better stewards of our environment. When will we all agree that something so simple as, say, leaving the lights on indicates a simple, stupid and lazy disrespect for the earth and its inhabitants? “There is clearly a well-organized and well-funded effort to undermine the science and cause confusion in the minds of the public,” says Kevin Trenberth, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder Colorado. The world is changing for the warmer and smoggier.

Precision climate modeling is forecast
United Press International (September 7, 2006)   By Jonathan Jay Gibian
U.S. scientists are predicting we will soon enjoy precision climate modeling, offering detail and scale only imagined a few years ago. . . . The goal is to provide what scientists call a fully integrated Earth system model that can be simulated every 15 minutes for centuries. . . . The research also involves scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, NASA, Duke University, Georgia Tech and various national labs to develop a climate end station.


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